The driveway chronicles

It's a never-ending battle. Man vs. nature. Nature usually wins. When I hear the rumble of thunder I know our driveway faces danger. Hard-pounding thunderstorms take their toll on a steep gravel driveway.

But man has a weapon: The DR PowerGrader. Nature gets her shot. Then man retaliates. Takes about 90 minutes to restore peace, serenity and a rutless driveway.

Until the next storm.

It’s a never-ending battle. Man vs. nature. Nature usually wins. When I hear the rumble of thunder I know our driveway faces danger. Hard-pounding thunderstorms take their toll on a steep gravel driveway.

But man has a weapon: The DR PowerGrader. Nature gets her shot. Then man retaliates. Takes about 90 minutes to restore peace, serenity and a rutless driveway.

Until the next storm.

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4 Responses

  1. I guess you’re right about those gully washers; there’s little we can do when it comes down all at once. It certainly wouldn’t be cost effective to put a culvert in that you could drive a small car through. From the looks of the high water debris line, I don’t think I’ll even try to cross the creek on my property. The neighbor did and it looks as if he started with one culvert and then added two more beside it with lots of concrete around the whole mess. Not the prettiest solution but it seems to be working. My place is at a corner so I’ll probably put my drive in from the side road, which is where the gate is now. Hey, maybe you can build and ark and we can make a movie about it! Oops! Too late.

  2. Let me put in my two cents worth as I am immensely qualified having dropped out of Tech’s landscape architecture graduate program with nothing left to do but a thesis. (How many times have you heard that one? All you have to do is change the name of the major).

    You know Doug, if you make a nice ditch and put in a piece or two of properly sized plastic (or metal) culvert so the water can go where it has to go (downhill), you won’t have to do that everytime it rains. Dragging the soft stuff into the gullies is just giving the water more stuff to move down to the alluvial plain that is no doubt forming somewhere downstream of your driveway. If you channel that water and get someone to pack down the drive real well with one of those vibrating miniature “steamrollers”, you should only have to dress it up once or twice a year.

    Of course, if you have too much time on your hands…

    Rick

  3. Rick:

    I appreciate the advice. We have drains that normally carry water under and away from the driveay and they work most of the time. But when three-and-a-half inches of rain falls in just a couple of hours it overwhelms all the drains. The rain gutters on our  roof overflow and the drains that normally keep our driveway safe can’t handle the load.

    Some of these storms have sent the creek that normally flows through a 36-inch culvert at the bottom of our driveway cascading over the driveway.

    In this last storm, water came out of the woods above our house in waves. When that happens, we don’t need a drain system so much as we need an ark.

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