Close to home

Two fluke accidents on the road this week hit close to home.

I didn't know Robert Alan Pauley but several of his relatives were friends in high school. The 45-year-old Floyd man died in a motorcycle accident near Riner. One report said he crashed after his Harley hit a deer on Meadow Brook Road in Montgomery County.

A close friend broke her leg and totaled her pickup truck Thursday after she hydroplaned off the road. She's home recovering with the help of her significant other who's had his share of drama in his life this year.

Both incidents remind us of the fragility of life -- even here in the country.

Two fluke accidents on the road this week hit close to home.

I didn’t know Robert Alan Pauley but several of his relatives were friends in high school. The 45-year-old Floyd man died in a motorcycle accident near Riner. One report said he crashed after his Harley hit a deer on Meadow Brook Road in Montgomery County.

A close friend broke her leg and totaled her pickup truck Thursday after she hydroplaned off the road. She’s home recovering with the help of her significant other who’s had his share of drama in his life this year.

Both incidents remind us of the fragility of life — even here in the country.

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4 Responses

  1. I just hate the fact that Bobby died in this accident. He was just such a good guy. He will be sadly missed.

  2. I’d like to weigh in, not that I’m qualified, but because it would not be fair to leave Robert out in the cold.

    He was such an amazing character in Floyd. Friend to so many as a result of his gregarious nature, easy smile, abilities to drill for water, play volley ball and engage so many people he encountered in meaningful conversation. Here is a man that lent a hand, or gave a cheer at the right time.

    I can’t do this story justice but here’s my best.
    The Pauley’s came to Floyd from West Virginia, the Grandfather drilled ventilation shafts in the coal fields. He met a local girl and settled right down, been drilling water wells ever since. Used to be you could ask Kenneth or Robert about a well installation, or even a region of the County and they could either recall or pull up records about geology yield and depth. This is fairly amazing in itself. But let’s recall these people could set up the rig, drill to access the aquifer, keep the machinery going and somehow manage to put the financial ends together for generations, all while satisfying the people. Not an easy task.

    His death was a complete shock and we should all realize that though we talk about people as though they are interchangeable cogs in the wheel. Robert is not one that can be replaced.

    Please join in his memory.

  3. Robert Pauley was the face of Floyd to us. His eyes constantly twinkled and he was quick with a joke, but never made us ignorant newcomers feel stupid. He was smart; he was kind; he was very cool…like the Floyd we’ve come to love.

    Robert offered to dig our long driveway up a steep mountain with no hesitation. It was done in a few days.

    We then faced with trepidation the task of putting in a well at the top of that mountain. He cheerily reassured us that if one spot didn’t work, we’d try another. He found water the first time, of course.

    Robert returned with his backhoe repeatedly to help us build a retaining wall or place massive boulders in a rock garden. He’d watch my face as he artfully moved his backhoe and if one of the rocks wasn’t perfectly placed, he’d say, “It’s just not QUITE right, is it, Becky? Let’s try THIS!”
    I planted iris around those rocks yesterday and remembered that Robert Pauley was invited to dinner a few weeks ago, but couldn’t make it. We so wish he had.

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