'Sorry, we're closed'

Planning to go out for a bite to eat? Call ahead. You might find out the eatery you went to last week is no longer in business.

Over the last month or so, Amy and I have headed for Christiansburg or Roanoke and planned to grab a bite at a favorite restaurant only to find the doors locked and a "for sale or lease" sign out front.

Restaurants tend to come and go but the down economy means some restaurants close without warning and leave both employees and would-be diners stranded.

On a trip to Wytheville Monday, I saw four restaurants closed along I-81. In Roanoke Tuesday, a half-dozen more.

Nationally, Brinkers International. announced it closed 35 restaurants and laid off 135 employees in its chain that includes Chilis. Starbucks is still finalizing its list of an addtional 300 stores that it will shutter in the coming weeks. The coffee chain will also fire 6,700 employees in the latest round of job cuts.

The closings, of course, are not limited to restaurants. After 60 years in business, Reed Lumber Company in Christiansburg is shutting down, citing both the economy and competition from the big boys at Lowes and Home Depot.

 

Planning to go out for a bite to eat? Call ahead. You might find out the eatery you went to last week is no longer in business.

Over the last month or so, Amy and I have headed for Christiansburg or Roanoke and planned to grab a bite at a favorite restaurant only to find the doors locked and a "for sale or lease" sign out front.

Restaurants tend to come and go but the down economy means some restaurants close without warning and leave both employees and would-be diners stranded.

On a trip to Wytheville Monday, I saw four restaurants closed along I-81. In Roanoke Tuesday, a half-dozen more.

Nationally, Brinkers International. announced it closed 35 restaurants and laid off 135 employees in its chain that includes Chilis. Starbucks is still finalizing its list of an addtional 300 stores that it will shutter in the coming weeks. The coffee chain will also fire 6,700 employees in the latest round of job cuts.

The closings, of course, are not limited to restaurants. After 60 years in business, Reed Lumber Company in Christiansburg is shutting down, citing both the economy and competition from the big boys at Lowes and Home Depot.

 

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10 Responses

  1. It was not Walmart that put a hurting on Reed’s Lumber. It was Lowes, Home Depot, and the poor economy. There is one of each in Christiansburg plus another Lowes in Fairlawn. Do not be so qucik to blame everything on Wal-Mart. Do you ever go a national chain when you go out to eat, maybe a Olive Garden or Panara Bread. Just think you are hurting the small local places to eat. Same thing.

  2. My wife and I just moved into Floyd the last of January. As for where we spend our money, we have yet to have to leave town. That may change but for now, we’re spendin’ our money right here in Floyd.

  3. Man, that is terrible news. Damn you, Walmart. I know you’re about to pee your pants with satisfaction, WallyWorld. One more hometown enterprise finally dies of malnourishment from the greatest US parasite of small towns ever. Live better, pay less. Let’em put that on the tombstone of American consumerism.

  4. yes, “common sense”? it is the same thing. Barnes & Nobles and Borders Books hurt the small unique privately owned bookstores that I used to love so much. Walmart hurts independently owned businesses as do chain restaurants, building supplies and on and on. It is one of the worst examples of “free enterprise” this country has ever seen. Instead of our dealings staying in the ‘village’ or ‘community’ and stimulating the local economy, we now stimulate corporations that produce cheaper and cheaper goods, in other countries. It is a sad sad state of affairs. Because of these stores we have compromised quality, fair wages, and american made products. I am not saying the people who work at Wal Mart are bad. I’m just saying that big chains opening stores all over the world have had dire consequences….including a very poor diet (junk food), eploitation of cheap labor in other countries, and a low quality of product to name a few.

  5. Exactly my point Doug. Chain stores such as True Value or even the Western Auto dont always outlast the local stores.

    That was what I meant when I asked “How is that True Value hardware store in Floyd progressing now compared to Farmer’s supply or Ingram’s or Wimmer’s?”

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