The ugly face of modern political action disrupted the Floyd County Board of Supervisors for a second-straight meeting Thursday night when rude and obnoxious members of the audience talked loudly among themselves and offered their own commentary to statements and actions of the board.

When Indian Valley Supervisor Fred Gerald asked the board to open the meeting with a prayer in recognition of the National Day of Prayer, an audience member yelled out that there “is no longer a National Day of Prayer. I heard on the radio today that the Supreme Court declared the National Day of Prayer unconstitutional.”

That rude and out-of-place comment not only disrupted the meeting, it was wrong. The Supreme Court has not acted on any legal challenge to the National Day of Prayer. The last court action came in April when a U.S. Court of Appeals overturned a lower court judge’s ruling that declared the National Day — passed by an Act of Congress — unconstitutional. The appeals court ruled that the atheist group challenging the day had no legal standing.

But some members of the audience probably left the meeting that night with the erroneous belief that a National Day of Prayer is now unconstitutional because one rude — and uninformed — individual blurted out a lie.

In fact, President Barack Obama observed the National Day of Prayer at Ground Zero in New York City on the same day the supervisors met.

That wasn’t the only interruption of the board meeting and it follows the budget session last week where members of the local tea party talked loudly during the meeting and made it impossible for other members of the audience to hear the actions of the board.

Such actions are not proper at a public meeting. They have no place in a civilized society or as part of public debate on an issue. They are simply rude behavior by misinformed troublemakers.

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